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Heat Lamp in shower?
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posted
Our roll-in shower is a bit cavernous. It is all tile, floor to ceiling. It is also cold. Hubby needs to lean on the walls for balance and it is too cold for him. He wants to replace the bulb in the recessed shower light with a heat bulb. It would mean removing the light cover and leaving the bulb exposed. The ceiling is 8 1/2 ft high. Is this dangerous? Can we use the existing can, or will we need a new one? Any alternative suggestions?
 
Posts: 13 | Registered: 19 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do not and I say again do not leave the cover off. A heat bulb can burst when touched with water.
quote:
Originally posted by nosey:
Our roll-in shower is a bit cavernous. It is all tile, floor to ceiling. It is also cold. Hubby needs to lean on the walls for balance and it is too cold for him. He wants to replace the bulb in the recessed shower light with a heat bulb. It would mean removing the light cover and leaving the bulb exposed. The ceiling is 8 1/2 ft high. Is this dangerous? Can we use the existing can, or will we need a new one? Any alternative suggestions?
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: 07 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That's what I thought, just neede some support on my ruling. Any suggestions on making the cave warmer?
 
Posts: 13 | Registered: 19 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nosey...
While it would cost a bit more than changing a bulb, the industry makes a sealed heat/light unit expecially for showers. The entire fixture
would have to be changed out, resulting in probable repair needed to tile ceiling. If the shower is as large as you describe, multiple units could possibly warm the area enough for
his comfort.
Sorry not more help, in 25 years we have done radiant heat in shower areas, and included the fixture above, but not as a retrofit situation.
when reading your post, my assumption is a fairly recent remodel to get a roll-in shower, so you wouldn't be up for the process all over again.
 
Posts: 23 | Location: Dallas area | Registered: 11 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dear Nosey:
Texas Builder and robertr2 are both absolutely on the mark with their postings. Do NOT allow the retrofit of a heat lamp over the shower without the tempered glass lens in place. This is a life-safety issue, not one of mere convenience or preferrence.
 
Posts: 105 | Location: West Haven, Conn. | Registered: 15 November 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm not in this business, but there are shower panels that may attach to your existing shower head pipe and mount on the shower wall. This would replace your single head with maybe up to a dozen individual outlets, with just a few screws or brackets, and a pipe wrench... maybe they just hang freely from the shower pipe, I'm not sure. These shower panels are probably about 4 feet high by one to two feet wide, and there really is a huge assortment of them. They have multiple shower heads, spray/steam outlets (like a sauna) installed the full length of the panel. I would guess some of these have adjustable mini-shower heads, allowing you to aim the upper outlets toward the side walls. The hot water can cascade down those tiles he leans against for a minute or so before he gets in the shower. I've seen these at home & garden/remodeling shows, and I imagine you could find good resources on the web by doing a search on "Shower Panels". Since a ceiling installed sunlamp will only shine straight down, (all-be-it in a cone shape)I don't believe it would warm the lower vertical side tiles as much as you'd like. I also think in the long run, using water to warm the tiles is safer and more effecient than using electricity.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 21 November 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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besides the safety issue which has already been pointed out, most of the recessed cans have a heat sensor in them which will shut the light off if it over heats, so your lights will be continually turning on and off while your in the shower.


brad
 
Posts: 42 | Registered: 24 May 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi, another alternative would be to install an infrared wall panel heater, which can be installed anywhere, being thin and flush mounted. It would also cut down on your mold and mildew, since it warms objects, like yourself, and your tiles, hence, drying them out, which would cut down on mildew....
hope I helped
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 12 August 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah...great & timely question for us. Didn't even think about this but we are doing rough in electrical now for our house. We plan on having a 6' tiled shower. Any suggestions on how to address this issue now, so it won't become a problem later?
 
Posts: 14 | Location: VA | Registered: 03 November 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sorry about that blank message for Doodle bug. If you are just starting your remodel and are using radiant heat in your floor you might be interested to know that radiant has been used in walls and ceilings for years in Europe.That would heat your tiles.

JimG
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: 15 November 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This was covered in a similar post elsewhere in this forum.

If you are in an area which is governed by the International Residential Code, this is what it says:

E3903.8 Wet or damp locations. Fixtures installed in wet or damp locations shall be installed so that water cannot enter or accumulate in wiring compartments, lampholders, or other electrical parts. All fixtures installed in wet locations ahall be marked SUITABLE FOR WET LOCATIONS.

Even if your area is not governed by this code (and most are), THINK about why the code writers included these words. It is a LIFE SAFETY ISSUE!! Please do not put a heat lamp in an unlensed fixture, and please do not put a heat lamp in a fixture unless it is specifically designed for the purpose. If you do not have the manufacturere's written instructions telling you that the fixture is designed to accept a heat lamp, ASSUME it is not.


Architect (NY) and Home Designer (PA)
 
Posts: 2870 | Location: Tobyhanna, PA | Registered: 24 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am so glad everyone supported my position on this. I knew it wasn't too bright of an idea, but just needed the back up.

Can anyone tell me about these infrared panels? Where would I get them? How expensive are they? Easy to install? Any brands I should be looking for?
You all are great!
 
Posts: 13 | Registered: 19 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Texas Builder stated that there were sealed heat lamps available which could be located in a shower. Baltimore Architect is search of such a unit that is rated for wet conditions by UL. Can anyone give me a lead to a manufacturer who actually produces such a creature?????
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 08 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am trying to do the same thing. Does anybody know where I can find a heat lamp that is covered?
 
Posts: 1 | Location: NorthWest | Registered: 22 January 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rather than a heat lamp, you could build the shower door such that it seals completely instead of leaving a gap at the top. Start the shower while you're undressing, and by the time you're ready it will be warm and steamy.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 22 January 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Who is the manufacturer of the sealed light heat fixture for showers?
quote:
Originally posted by Texas Builder:
Nosey...
While it would cost a bit more than changing a bulb, the industry makes a sealed heat/light unit expecially for showers. The entire fixture
would have to be changed out, resulting in probable repair needed to tile ceiling. If the shower is as large as you describe, multiple units could possibly warm the area enough for
his comfort.
Sorry not more help, in 25 years we have done radiant heat in shower areas, and included the fixture above, but not as a retrofit situation.
when reading your post, my assumption is a fairly recent remodel to get a roll-in shower, so you wouldn't be up for the process all over again.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 03 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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SmilerI HAPPENED TO COME ACROSS YOUR DELIMA TODAY. JUST WANTED TO LET YOU KNOW THAT PROGRESS LIGHTING DOES MAKE A IN THE SHOWER HEAT LAMP CAN LIGHT. HOPE THIS HELPS. IT IS APPROVED.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 25 August 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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