Message Boards

Guidelines
  • 1) Before posting a message, please be sure you are in the appropriate category.
  • 2) No advertising is allowed on HGTVPro's Message Boards.
  • 3) Off-topic and off-color postings will be deleted at our discretion.
  • 4) Please be nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
  • 5) Posts containing certain words will trigger moderation of the post, whether words are contained in the post or in the signature line. These words mostly cover political and religious topics, which are TOTALLY off the topic covered by HGTVPro.
HGTVRemodels fans: Beginning November 4, the Message Boards will no longer be a feature of HGTVRemodels.com. You can still join the conversation and connect with fellow fans on our Facebook page. Just visit Facebook.com/HGTVRemodels to get started. Thank you for making this community a rewarding and inspiring experience for so many years.

    boards.hgtvremodels.com    HGTVRemodels Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Feedback  Hop To Forums  Your Questions & Comments    Removing large bathroom mirror
Page 1 2 
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Removing large bathroom mirror
 Login/Join 
posted
How do I safely remove a large bathroom mirror from over a master bath double sink? I think it's up with adhesive since I don't see any clips/screws.
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: 31 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Most likely the mirror was glued using a asphalt type adhesive which is very common. The mirror most likely will break when you attempt to remove. Even if you could get it free from the wall, you could not remove the adhesive as it will remove the silver backing on the mirror. Simply cover all surfaces in the bathroom with heavy dropcloths wear heavy gloves and long sleeve shirts to protect you when the mirror cracks as it will and peel it off using a pry bar. You may also want to use a lot of masking tape on the surface of the mirror in an attempt to keep the glass from falling all over the place when it does break. Carefully wrap the broken glass in lots of newspaper tape and dispose of carefully.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Also make sure you wear safety Glasses
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 10 August 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
The safety issue is paramount, here, since there is no exaggeration with the other posted information. As the glass breaks from the act of prying it, it sometimes lets go suddenly, in the direction of the force being applied--usually right back at you. You should also know that the underlying wall surface will be severely damaged, likely requiring replacement.
 
Posts: 105 | Location: West Haven, Conn. | Registered: 15 November 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I have removed large mirrors using braided wire to saw thru the adhesive. I suggest 3 people for the operation. 2 sawing with the wire. 1 holding the mirror upright and in place after it is freed. Tape the face of the mirror heavily, totally is preferable. Use ALL of the safety suggested items in the previous posts. Go slowly and if you hear a crack, go to the post concerning the demolition of the mirror.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 20 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I have a customer that had the same problem and the mirror was to close to the walls on both sides to do the wire trick, so I found 12 inch wide duct tape at Home Depot and taped over the entire mirror. Then with goggles & face sheild, gloves and long sleeve shirt I broke the mirror of in pieces and pryed with wide putty knife from the wall. Then as I removed the broken glass I just used a knife to cut the tape at the edge of broken piece. It looked like a liquid nails had been used on the mirror and all but one spot pulled just a little of the paper off as the wall had not been finished under the mirror. Just place plastic under your work and start from the top and work down, the tape kept the cleanup very simple & SAFE.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 21 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I own a construction company, and do quite a few bathroom remods. Here is how I do it... First as all of the other posts have noted, safety is a first. Tape the glass, wear safety glasses, and long sleeves. Now get some shims and a pry bar, and a heat gun. Wrap the end of the pry bar with tape to make it cushioned, just two wraps. Slide the shims in behind the mirror anywhere you can, all the way around until they are snug. Heat the perimeter of the mirror slowly and periodically check the shims for looseness. Push the shims in as the mirror releases. Work from one side or top down. When the shims are all the way in, double em up. This works about 3 out of five time for me with no damage to the mirror, just be careful not to over heat the mirror, and don't get anxious and try to point the heat gun behind the mirror. Good luck, remember... SLOWLY does it.
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: 21 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
One more thing, the pry bar noted above is only for light prying to get the shims farther in as the glue begins to release, I suggest only using it if you must. This process works, I have three in tact, re-usable 3 foot by 8 foot mirrors in my shop to back it up, but sometimes you lose em', so be careful.
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: 21 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I run into this problem often enough that I sought out advise from my glass supplier. I am a custom cabinet maker and custom furniture maker in North Alabama and do 12-15 master bath cabinet replacements a year and often need to get a glued mirror down. I used to use the "tape and break" method too until I ran into one nearly 8 feet long! Went to my glass and mirror suppler for advise and they hooked me up with a set of the suction cups the installers use. They loaned them to me at first but it worked so well I went back and order a set for the shop. Basically I set the cups near the top of the mirror and then tug gently at the mirror until the paper on the drywall begins to fail and then work my down the mirror until it's completly free. Then I use the cups as "handles" to take the intact mirror out of the house. We have a Habitat recycling center here in town and they take the mirrors and cut them down for reuse. Haven't broken one yet using this method. Minor wall damage is easily repaired and often the new mirror covers it anyway. Since I work mostly alone the wire method is too hard for me.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 21 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Sanctuary Woods Cabinets:
I run into this problem often enough that I sought out advise from my glass supplier. I am a custom cabinet maker and custom furniture maker in North Alabama and do 12-15 master bath cabinet replacements a year and often need to get a glued mirror down. I used to use the "tape and break" method too until I ran into one nearly 8 feet long! Went to my glass and mirror suppler for advise and they hooked me up with a set of the suction cups the installers use. They loaned them to me at first but it worked so well I went back and order a set for the shop. Basically I set the cups near the top of the mirror and then tug gently at the mirror until the paper on the drywall begins to fail and then work my down the mirror until it's completly free. Then I use the cups as "handles" to take the intact mirror out of the house. We have a Habitat recycling center here in town and they take the mirrors and cut them down for reuse. Haven't broken one yet using this method. Minor wall damage is easily repaired and often the new mirror covers it anyway. Since I work mostly alone the wire method is too hard for me.
I tried your method today and it worked!!!!! I am a petite female that is only 5'3" tall and I had no problem getting the mirror off with the suction cups that I used and I did it without any help. I didn't even have to use professional suction cups. I used suction cups that are used to remove dents from cars. Not one piece broke off of the mirror. Thank you so much, Sanctuary Woods Cabinets, for posting this. I'm going to tell everyone of this method. Smiler


A female who loves DIY! :)
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Murfreesboro, TN | Registered: 13 July 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of UdontKnowMe
posted Hide Post
quote:
Now get some shims and a pry bar, and a heat gun.


The heat gun method sounds best to me because the mirror I'm removing is big, glued extra-good, and I can tell it wont just pull off (even with suction cups). Can you recommend what type of heat gun to use? Or, do you think a regular household iron might do the trick (as long as the mirror is taped over well)?
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 05 November 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
The heat gun may do the trick, but the way most folks remove mirrors that have been glued to wall is to use a piano wire. Simply use the wire to saw back and forth while another person pulls slightly on mirror with suction cups.

But in most cases the mirrior will be damaged regardless of method used the siver backing pulls off the glass or the glass cracks. The older the mirror the greater the chance it will crack as glass gets more brittle with age.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of UdontKnowMe
posted Hide Post
Piano wire method wont do it. The mirror butts up to door trim on the right side, counter top on the bottom, and at the left edge the wall angles in, so no way to pull the wire straight across.

Still wondering if anyone has tried a household iron for heating the glue. Also wondering if there are any solvents that would loosen the glue so the mirror would pull off more easily.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 05 November 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RenosRedNecks:
I own a construction company, and do quite a few bathroom remods. Here is how I do it... First as all of the other posts have noted, safety is a first. Tape the glass, wear safety glasses, and long sleeves. Now get some shims and a pry bar, and a heat gun. Wrap the end of the pry bar with tape to make it cushioned, just two wraps. Slide the shims in behind the mirror anywhere you can, all the way around until they are snug. Heat the perimeter of the mirror slowly and periodically check the shims for looseness. Push the shims in as the mirror releases. Work from one side or top down. When the shims are all the way in, double em up. This works about 3 out of five time for me with no damage to the mirror, just be careful not to over heat the mirror, and don't get anxious and try to point the heat gun behind the mirror. Good luck, remember... SLOWLY does it.


I used this method today and it worked like a charm! I removed a 3' x 4' mirror attached tot he wall with Liquid nails. As RenosRedNecks stated, take it slow.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 25 April 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Thanks for the information, Busted Stuff, but I ended up using suction cups that are used to removed dents from cars that I bought at a hardware store. I put a suction cup at the top of the mirror on each side. I slowly pulled the mirror and it came down perfectly. Not a piece broke off of the mirror! I did this several months ago and have mudded, drywalled, sanded, primed, painted the wall and put up my new mirror. Smiler


A female who loves DIY! :)
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Murfreesboro, TN | Registered: 13 July 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Don Ingman:
I have removed large mirrors using braided wire to saw thru the adhesive. I suggest 3 people for the operation. 2 sawing with the wire. 1 holding the mirror upright and in place after it is freed. Tape the face of the mirror heavily, totally is preferable. Use ALL of the safety suggested items in the previous posts. Go slowly and if you hear a crack, go to the post concerning the demolition of the mirror.
I was able to use the suction cups to remove the mirror by myself and I'm a petite woman.


A female who loves DIY! :)
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Murfreesboro, TN | Registered: 13 July 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I have an 8'x 4' mirror. Can I cut it up so that I can take It down stairs?
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: 06 September 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Be careful with the removal, because my mirror was not glued on and it fell down as I pulled off the countertop which included the.
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: 06 September 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
If the mirror is already down, sure you can cut it like any other glass sheet.
If its still on the wall. Use lots of duct tape or regular masking tape. (the blue painters tape is not sticky enough) Cover the mirror with lots of x,s and then attempt to cut it out with a wire and heat gun to soften the glue. If it breaks the tape will hold most of it together. Then just tap lightly with hammer and it will crack in smaller manageable sizes.
Be sure to wear heavy gloves and eye protection when handling this. Also do not carry flat. Carry it on the edge so it has little or no pressure on the glass so it does not crack again.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
The mirror is 8' x 4'. Should I try to cut it standing up and not on the carpet? What if I put a piece of plywood on the floor and cut it on top of the plywood? Do I cut it on the glass side or the silver side?
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: 06 September 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2  
 

    boards.hgtvremodels.com    HGTVRemodels Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Feedback  Hop To Forums  Your Questions & Comments    Removing large bathroom mirror