Message Boards

Guidelines
  • 1) Before posting a message, please be sure you are in the appropriate category.
  • 2) No advertising is allowed on HGTVPro's Message Boards.
  • 3) Off-topic and off-color postings will be deleted at our discretion.
  • 4) Please be nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
  • 5) Posts containing certain words will trigger moderation of the post, whether words are contained in the post or in the signature line. These words mostly cover political and religious topics, which are TOTALLY off the topic covered by HGTVPro.
HGTVRemodels fans: Beginning November 4, the Message Boards will no longer be a feature of HGTVRemodels.com. You can still join the conversation and connect with fellow fans on our Facebook page. Just visit Facebook.com/HGTVRemodels to get started. Thank you for making this community a rewarding and inspiring experience for so many years.

    boards.hgtvremodels.com    HGTVRemodels Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Best Practices  Hop To Forums  Foundation    failed perc test
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
failed perc test
 Login/Join 
posted
I want to build a home on two lots that I own within a coastal community in NC, and have had cleared. However, the lot next to mine just failed the perc test, so I'm certain mine will also. This area has much sandy soil and very little clay. My question is whether planting some kind of ground cover or something with deep roots will help break up the soil. How about deep tilling? Is there anything that can be done other than waiting the 7 years before the city sewer system is brought in?
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 04 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Why did it fail? Because of high water table? In sandy soil, the water should have disappeared in a flash.

Another option, if the soil is indeed impervious, would be to excavate the drainage field area, and fill it with porous material. Talk to a good civil engineer in your area, who should be able to outline your options.


Architect (NY) and Home Designer (PA)
 
Posts: 2870 | Location: Tobyhanna, PA | Registered: 24 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Thanks for your response. According to a realtor in my area, the lots don't perc because they are "hardpan." How can that be if the soil is predominantly sandy?
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 04 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
The soil may not be sandy at the depth where the perc test must be taken. There are ways to install a septic system in almost any condition. Consult a good civil engineer in your area.


Architect (NY) and Home Designer (PA)
 
Posts: 2870 | Location: Tobyhanna, PA | Registered: 24 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I'm perchasing a property in the Pocono Mtns of PA near Tobyhanna. I was wondering about who would be a good contact person to do the perc test in that area. There is a house on the adjacent lot, so I'm wondering what the chances of my lot perc-ing as well. what can I expect to pay to improve a lot to pass the perc test. I'm also looking for a reputible builder near Lake Wallenpaupeck.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Leesport PA | Registered: 23 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I have the same situation as you. Also, in coastal NC, our lot failed perc test. I have been told I should hire a soil scientist and have been given the name of a really good one. However, I was wondering if you have found any solution to your problem. Our soil was high in shell material and the "wrong color". Please let me know if you have any suggestions. I'd be glad to share the name of the scientist.

quote:
Originally posted by Vicki in NC:
I want to build a home on two lots that I own within a coastal community in NC, and have had cleared. However, the lot next to mine just failed the perc test, so I'm certain mine will also. This area has much sandy soil and very little clay. My question is whether planting some kind of ground cover or something with deep roots will help break up the soil. How about deep tilling? Is there anything that can be done other than waiting the 7 years before the city sewer system is brought in?
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Coastal NC | Registered: 12 March 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Here in Minnesota we have areas with a lot of thick hard clay. Obviously not ideal for septic systems so a lot of homeowners go with what's called a "mound" system. Basically it's a big hump on top of the ground that is your septic system. The point behind it is to distribute the sewage over a greater square footage, thus requiring less perc per square foot. Like Richard said, talk to a civil engineer or a septic installer in your area. They are the people who would know what your options are.


General Contractor/Home Builder
 
Posts: 498 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 15 January 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
You may be in luck. I have installed a number of alternative system in Coastal NC and would recommend the pure flow system by Bord na mona. It is a above ground system with two tanks which pump the effluent into above ground pods filled with 7 layers of peat. The effluent leaving the bottom of the pods is very clean and this system may get you where you want to be. I would contact a soil scientist in you area and ask about designing a system for you lot.

It worked on my lot....
Bill
ReddiWall@yahoo.com
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: 30 March 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Have you had any experience with failed perc tests in the NC mountains? Our lot just failed because of rock, even though there are homes on either side of it. Any suggestions?
 
Posts: 1 | Location: NC | Registered: 25 April 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
try puraflo.tv It's a local PA website but a national solution if you can get 10" of perc. Tell him Dr Weston I said hi. He'll be able to refer you to a NC dealer. Good Luck
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Leesport PA | Registered: 23 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
To Vicki and Ann in NC: the best potential solution to your perc problems is to hire a qualified consulting firm that is Licensed in North Carolina. The rules in NC are different from those in other states such as PA. Different technologies and approaches are also more appropriate in the mountains versus the coastal areas. I recommend contacting Soil & Environmental Consultants. They serve NC and SC from the mountains to the coast and have been a leader in this industry for 20 years. They have an office in Raleigh, Greensboro, and Concord. Thanks, let me know if you have any questions. I work for S&EC, my direct phone number is 336-669-0648.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 16 October 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I just brought a arce of land in Penn forest streams, failed four perc test prior. I got the land on the internet, spoke to the sewer dept and they are willing to redo the tests. What are my choices to repair land. The last test, 2 years ago, only had 5" of good soil.


marcellus green
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: 11 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
You need to put in a raised bed septic system. This type of failure is becoming more common in many areas of the country. Raised water tables due to more and more building I would guess is the cause. In any case the septic tank would be put in the ground and then the effluent would be pumped to a raised bed above the normal ground level. Depending on where you live will determine the cost. But it is not cheep.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
thanks for your reply will look into, anyone use open all?


marcellus green
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: 11 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Stay away from chemicals that claim to loosen soils. Your going to waste your money. Perk is not just about water going down, but where it goes once it goes down. If you think your going to fix your perk by loosening soil in the area of the septic leach field your going to be in for a very expensive surprise once the area that has been treated fills with water.
Get a qualified septic engineer to deterime what the course of action should be taken in your case. Every property has their own challenges, and what ever they are they will stand behind the end result. Chemcials that loosen soil does just that, they will not fix your septic once your perk stops working. They will not be held responsible for the end results if they do not work. A septic engineer would be the one to go to.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Ok so the open all is not the choice I'm looking for. Sounds like my best choice is the raised septic tank. However, won't I still need to pass a perc test. My worry is that the township may still hold me to the same 20". I looked at a system called peraflo. Is this one of the systems you are talking about. At what I paid for the land I would be willing to go to a higher price unit due to the fact it would fix my issue. The value the land would increase if I could pass with this type of system


marcellus green
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: 11 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
A septic engineer will provide all the necessary paperwork that will pass the raised bed system with the township its going in. AS the design of the bed itself will provide the pass that is needed to install the system.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Vicki in NC:
I want to build a home on two lots that I own within a coastal community in NC, and have had cleared. However, the lot next to mine just failed the perc test, so I'm certain mine will also. This area has much sandy soil and very little clay. My question is whether planting some kind of ground cover or something with deep roots will help break up the soil. How about deep tilling? Is there anything that can be done other than waiting the 7 years before the city sewer system is brought in?


I am in a similar situation and I found out some interesting information that might help you. Are your lots in Zip 28443?
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 07 August 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

    boards.hgtvremodels.com    HGTVRemodels Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Best Practices  Hop To Forums  Foundation    failed perc test