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    boards.hgtvremodels.com    HGTVRemodels Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Best Practices  Hop To Forums  Foundation    Is it o.k. to snake the weeping tile from the sump pit
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Is it o.k. to snake the weeping tile from the sump pit
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I am not sure if my weeping tile is plugged or not. We have a high water table in our area and the sump pumps run all the time. For about the last 10 years we have raised the water level so the pump only goes off if the water is above an inch below the floor. The pump would go off every spring. This year with the amount of snow and rain we received before the thaw we have now flooded. Not from the sump pit but from the cold joint. We have since regraded, extended downspouts and removed all landscaping from the walls outside in the last month. Water has stopped streaming in but when it rains it still gets wet from the cold joint. Steady stream enters sump pit. and we have lowered the level to below the inlet pipes. Is it possible the ground is still saturated that is why the cold joints still get wet? How long does it take to dry up, we are on clay and sand.
I should also mention that we are on septic and as far as I know do not have any cleanouts. Also there is a floor drain which I don't know where it leads since it has been covered over. A bathroom was roughed in which was covered over and we uncovered to see water coming up through the floor, so we removed the cap off the drain and the floor seems to be draining to the sewage pump which was installed. It has been draining for a month, going off at the beginning every 10 minutes but now maybe once per 1/2 hour. Also sump runs every 3 minutes for about 15 seconds. Is this reasonable.
Thanks for the reply.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: London Ontario | Registered: 13 May 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Water coming in at the "cold joint" is most often water coming in through the walls. It is possible there are cracks outside that must be repaired, and then the wall must be waterproofed. A hose test will probably reveal where the leak is (or leaks are), so you may not have to do the whole wall.


Architect (NY) and Home Designer (PA)
 
Posts: 2870 | Location: Tobyhanna, PA | Registered: 24 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would look at the discharge. Where is the sump pump discharging. Is it possible you are recycling water? Any waterproofing or water control system relies on a means to remove the water, ie, lateral lines to city sewers, tile run to day light, sump pums discharging to surface dry wells,etc. If the flow is stopped, or impeded, water can back up and often comes in at the cove, where the floor meets the wall. I would buy some tracer dye and put a very SMALL AMOUNT, in the sump crock and see if it appears back in the basement. Too answer your qustion about snaking, yes you can snake through the crock. If you are keeping the water level in the crock lower than the tiles, and the tiles are not flowing, than by all means try the easiest and cheapest fix, snaking.


Integrity Waterproofing
 
Posts: 204 | Location: Lakewood, Ohio | Registered: 25 November 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sump Drains into a storm drain which runs along the side of the property about 15 feet away from the house. Pipe take the water to the road. Pipe is 6 feet below ground and is not backed up where I run sump, I also don't see it backed up on road. I am at the bottom of the hill and the whole street drains down the road via the storm drains.
I do have a step crack from a window which goes down to the foundation. I am not sure how deep. What is the best thing to seal this crack?
Thanks for the answer on the snake.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: London Ontario | Registered: 13 May 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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LicensedWaterproofR has described many times how to repair and waterproof basement wall cracks. That's where you should look for your answer.


Architect (NY) and Home Designer (PA)
 
Posts: 2870 | Location: Tobyhanna, PA | Registered: 24 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you have a step crack on a block wall, it may indicative of settlement. You could have water coming through there, but a lot of times that water will end up in the block cavities and still can come out onto the floor via the cove joint.

The frequency of your pump running obviously is dictated by the amount of intake. You may be able to raise the float switch (not the pump!) to slow down the frequency of operation, as long as the level of the float switch is set no higher than where the drain tiles enter the pit.

As far as soils, sand is a good perculating soil, clay is not. Clay will retain or trap water when it is in an expansive state (wet periods). It is also important to note that water coming in through the cove joint (especially with a high water table) means it cannot reach your tiles because it has no way to get there if there is no barrier or passage way between the slab and the footing ledge, or it is possible that water coming in from the exterior side of the construction joint where the wall and footing intersect cannot get to the tile if there is too much water under the slab and the tiles are overloaded or again, blocked or clogged by soil.
 
Posts: 26 | Location: Midwest | Registered: 31 May 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To answer your question. Yes you can snake your drains. You must be aware however if the tiles are are older that your cleaning out you need to go slow and not use and agressive bit on the snake. New systems installed often require cleanouts to allow for this.
Do not change the setting of your sump pit. If has been working correctly all these years changing something that has nothing to do with clogged drains is not the correct repair.
 
Posts: 1933 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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