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    boards.hgtvremodels.com    HGTVRemodels Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Best Practices  Hop To Forums  Interior Finishes    installing wood slices as floor tiles?
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installing wood slices as floor tiles?
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posted
Client saw in a magazine a floor of log "slices" that were laid as tiles with grout around them, etc.

Any thoughts or knowledge on the proper way to treat (shellac, seal) and install this type of floor?

We'll be making the "tiles" too - I assume.

Thanks.
 
Posts: 19 | Registered: 20 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It is called end grain flooring. Search the internet for this.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 22 June 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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check Oregon Lumber
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 20 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We did this to our own floor over concrete. We sliced 2"X 6" red oak into 1/4" slices. We saved the saw dust and mixed it with sanding sealer for the grout. It turned out great. If I were to do this again, I would seal both sides of the 'tile' before the glue. The tiles wanted to curl when I put glue on the one side to put them down. The glue wet one side while the top side was dry, therefore, curl. Also, I would use actual grout to instead of the saw dust. After time the grout wants to pop out. Using actual grout might be a problem because it won't allow the wood to move....use at your own risk.... After sanding, we sealed it with sanding sealer, and then poly.......It's a beautiful flooring, but VERY time consuming.... good luck.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: mn | Registered: 21 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do you think a grout with latex additive would "give" enough for the wood??
 
Posts: 19 | Registered: 20 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by larsoncoach:
Do you think a grout with latex additive would "give" enough for the wood??


I don't know. The only way I know, would be to try it on something expendable. If you have a little time to experiment and see how it looks/reacts.... ??? Try calling the manufacturer of the latex additive and see what they would recomend...
 
Posts: 2 | Location: mn | Registered: 21 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bob Villa did a project like this before, You may find a link to the project in his website.

I think he also made his own grout out of saw dust, (Maybe mixed with wood glue?)
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Southeastern Massachusetts | Registered: 30 November 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Installing wood tiles or slices on a floor is typically going to be a problem. What type of sub-flooring is in place, concrete slab-on-grade or was-wood sub-floor? Concrete slab installation is going to require a waterproof membrane to protect the wood from moisture vapor transmission that will cause curling/warping of the wood or dishing of the tiles just as the water based adhesives will cause curling. This is a problem in natural stone and agglomerate tiles and will be worst with wood. Due to the moisture and thermal expansion differences between wood and mortar, grouting of the wood tile joints is a problem. The latex modified grouts will not prevent the movement and will not "give". You will need to include perimeter isolation joints and expansion joints in any installation. How wide are your joints going to be? Can you find any sanded Urethane caulk?
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: 25 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The sub floor will be wood, do i need to put the concrete board down first, as with tile installation?

The tiles are round... slices of logs - if you will - so the joints are not even. It will almost be placed like flagstones. If i found the caulk, do you think the latex additive grout could fill the bigger spaces, or should we fill entirely with the caulk?

Also - just a note that this floor will only be in a small space - 8x3 foot area.

Thanks!!
 
Posts: 19 | Registered: 20 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is a problem! I am concerned with the deflection of the floor structure and trying to hold this all together without cracking. A properly installed cement board should improve the stiffness of the floor in this area.Use thin-set mmortar to set the cement board to the floor and screww per munafacturers recommendations. Check with thin-set mortar manufacturers to see what they recommend for settin the wood tiles. I would like to see a mortar with some flex properties utilized, however, there is the problem with cracking of the joint next to the wood and that could be caulked with a sanded color matched caulk at a later date or right away. Minimize the water in the grout mix to help in the shrinkage problem of the grout.
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: 25 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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