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Dishwasher winterization
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posted
I have a weekend home that I only occasionally occupy during the winter (Northeast). When I leave I shut off the water, drain and pour RV anti-freeze in the sink drains and toilet bowls and tanks. I am then able to turn off the heat. I have been doing this for years with success. Last year I bought a dishwasher and at the end of the winter I experienced a leak. A part was replaced and though I can't prove it, I suspect that there was leftover water in that part that froze and broke. My question is, is there any way to winterize a dishwasher? Thanks in advance.
 
Posts: 57 | Location: East Stroudsburg, PA | Registered: 17 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You're right.

Dishwashers accumulate water in the bottom of the unit that acts as a trap.

There is also water left in the water line to the unit.

Proper winterization of a home not only involves taking the steps you have done, but also either forcing pressurized air into drain lines to remove any water left in low spot in the line or pumping anti-freeze into all water lines to displace the water.

Unless you disconnect the water supply to the DW and pour antifreeze into the inside bottom of the washing compartment, you will have water remaining in the unit which will freeze.

You may also need to disconnect the drain to remove water or add antifreeze to the drain line to prevent freezing.
 
Posts: 453 | Registered: 19 July 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Homebild:

FINALLY-someone who understands my situation and the inner workings of a dishwasher. Neither Kitchen Aid, the person who replaced the broken part nor other "experts" have been able to explain what's going on the way you did. Thanks. I have the ability to remotely turn on or off the heat and right now the heat is on (even though I am not there) until I can rectify this situation. Can you give me specific instructions as to:

-How do I introduce RV anti-freeze into these lines and if I disconnect the supply and drain lines as you suggested won't I just have anti-freeze laying on my kitchen floor as opposed to water?

-Is RV anti-freeze safe for a dishwasher?

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
Posts: 57 | Location: East Stroudsburg, PA | Registered: 17 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
FINALLY-someone who understands my situation and the inner workings of a dishwasher. Neither Kitchen Aid, the person who replaced the broken part nor other "experts" have been able to explain what's going on the way you did. Thanks. I have the ability to remotely turn on or off the heat and right now the heat is on (even though I am not there) until I can rectify this situation. Can you give me specific instructions as to:

-How do I introduce RV anti-freeze into these lines and if I disconnect the supply and drain lines as you suggested won't I just have anti-freeze laying on my kitchen floor as opposed to water?

-Is RV anti-freeze safe for a dishwasher?


One simply method would be to pour a dilute mixture of antfreeze into the bottom of your dishwasher and run the drain cycle just long enough ( a few seconds) to see the antifreeze coming into the sink drain. You would then simply leave the antifreeze solution in the bottom of the dishwasher and drain hose, and this method would actually alleviate having to disconnect the drain hose.

The water inlet line operates on a built in fast-acting-valve for most dishwashers.

What this means is that this valve only opens to allow water into the unit during certain cycles.

Disconnecting the supply tube to the dishwasher will not allow water or antifreeze to flow out of the dishwasher because the fast-acting-valve is closed when it is not in use.

Antifreeze should be safe for use in the DW because most are simply acohol based and completely non-toxic. You might check with your dishwasher manufacturer to be sure the antifreeze you use is compatible.
 
Posts: 453 | Registered: 19 July 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Homebild:

Thanks. That clarifies things and I will follow your directions. One final point. The part that was replaced was accessed by disconnecting the supply line so I wonder if it was the valve you referenced. If so, is there any need to somehow get anti-freeze into that valve as well since I assume the drain system is separate from the supply system and therefore protecting the drain would not affect that valve. Or would just disconnecting be sufficient (which I didn't do last year). Sorry for belaboring this but we can now "put this to bed". Thanks again.
 
Posts: 57 | Location: East Stroudsburg, PA | Registered: 17 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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IF you are really concerned about it, disconnect the water supply then turn the DW on for a second or two. This will open the valve to let water in, and since there is no supply connected to the unit, whatever water is left in the valve will simply drain out.
 
Posts: 453 | Registered: 19 July 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great. Thanks.
 
Posts: 57 | Location: East Stroudsburg, PA | Registered: 17 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have been winterizing my DW for a few years. Shut off water supply and disconnect and drain the supply line. Turn on DW and inlet valve will open thus allowing water to drain out of valve. Most breaks occur here. Pour 1/2 gal RV antifreeze into DW and set to start cycle. Since water is off the washer will cycle. Cancel the cycle and DW will drain thus expelling antifreeze into drain line. Wipe down interior and have a great vacation. Washing machines are the same process. After water is turned off, turn on washer and blow into supply lines thus clearing inlet valve. fill with 1 gal RV antifreeze and discharge antifreeze.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 07 July 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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GREAT idea! I was also disconnecting the 2 drain lines and using a wet/dry vac to remove the excess water but I will try your suggestion because it is a headache disconnecting and reconnecting. Thanks rcsam.
 
Posts: 57 | Location: East Stroudsburg, PA | Registered: 17 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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